VISAS & YACHTIE INFO

CONTACTS IN ANTIBES

Accommodation

The Grapevine – Portside house, 16 Rue de la Baume, Antibes, 06600

Seaside house, 25 Rue du Bas Castelet, Antibes, 0660006 28 68 57 19,

www.crewgrapevine.com

The Glamorgan -20 Avenue Thiers, Antibes, 06600,06 25 16 54 57,

www.theglamorgan.com

Crew House – Avenue Saint Roch, Antibes, 06600,04 92 90 49 39

Debbie’s Crew House – 67 Bd Beau Rivage Prolonge, Antibes, 06600,06 32 38 75 28,

Local Transport/ Nice Airport

SNCF +33 4 92 14 85 62 www.sncf.frAntibes Bus Station +33 4 93 34 37 60English Driver +33 783 286 528Nice Airport 08 20 423 333 www.nice.aeroport.fr

Health & Emergencies

SAMU (Ambulance) 15Police 17Fire Brigade 18Emergency Services (english) 112MCA Approved DoctorsDr Patrick Ireland & Dr Christopher Besse (MCA app.) +33 493 12 95 66Dr Bruno Lavagne (MCA app.) “Le Vendome” C +33 493 67 03 07Dr Coralie Cauchois +33 643 91 75 79

Bars

Bacchus Blue Lady 

Drinkers Club

Enoteca

Hopstore 

The Quays

CONTACTS IN PALMA

Accommodation

Hostal Almudaina, Avenida Jaime III, 9 Palma de Mallorca+34 971 727 340 www.hotelalmudaina.com

Costa Azul – www.hotelcostaazul.es

Hostal Bellver – http://www.melia.com/es/hoteles/espana/mallorca/tryp-palma-bellver-hotel/index.html

Apartments & Crew Accommodation

www.suyt.es+34 971 962 551 info@suyt.es www.suyt.es

Ian Stairs

istairs@aol.com

Local Transport

Taxi Palma +34 971 40 14 14Taxi Calvia +34 971 13 47 00Bus Palma http://www.emtpalma.es/Bus Calvia http://www.tib.org/portal/web/ctm/

MCA Approved Doctor

Dr Johanna Clark (Club de Mar Medical Centre) +34 619 982 142Dr Amit Bajpai (British Medical Centre) +34 971 683 511

Emergency details

Emergency Services (English) 112Fire brigade 080Local Police 092

Bars

Corner Bar 

Escape Bar 

Havanna Bar 

Lab Bar 

Mojo Beach 

Shamrock

CONTACTS FORT LAUDERDALE

Accommodation

Camille Accommodations, Various Locations Ft. Lauderdale, FL954 504‐2822 – Camille@camille.us.com – www.camille.us.com

Smart Move, 716 SE 17th Street, Ft Lauderdale, FL, 33316954 525‐9559 – Frontdesk@smart‐move.com – www.smart‐move.com

Cheryl’s Crew House, Various Locationsrancocheryl@gmail.com

Mary’s Crew House, 816 SE 12th Street, Ft. Lauderdale, FL 33316954 242‐1109 – Maryscrewhouse@yahoo.com – www.maryscrewhouse.comYachty

Rentals, Various Locations954 226‐9177 –

Cynthea@yachtyrentals.com – www.YACHTYRENTALS.com

Local Transport

Uber ‐ www.uber.comYellow Cab – 954‐777‐7777Lyft – www.Lyft.comDa Yachtie Bus – 954 226‐9177Scooter Rentals – 954 226‐9177 – www.yachtyrentals.com

Health & Emergencies

MCA -Approved DoctorDr Ed Grenet (954) 525-7595

police, fire, emergency medical services 911

Non-Emergency Number for Police and Fire 954-764-HELP (4357)

Broward General Hospital, 1600 S Andrews Ave, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33316954 355‐5760

Urgent Care, 6300 N Andrews Ave, Fort Lauderdale, FL 33309954 492‐2035

Bars

Tap 42  Rhythm and Vine, Waxy O’Conner’s , Blondies, Elbo Room,

Useful to Know....

what is a super yacht

The term luxury yacht generally refers to an expensive, privately owned yacht that is professionally crewed… ‘Also known as a super yacht, a luxury yacht may be either a sailing or motor yacht’, (Wikipedia). In actual fact, there is no official industry wide definition for the terms super, mega or giga, however we consider any yacht over 24 meters as super, over 60 meters as mega and any yacht over 100 meters as termed a giga-yacht.

what is the yachting industry? 

There are currently over 10,000 super yachts in the world, ranging from 24 meters to over 160 meters, which require professional and qualified crew. The yachting industry is a high-end, multi-million euro luxury business in which the rich and famous own or charter super yachts which in turn require top-notch crew members. In the last few decades, theyachting industry has captured the attention of the media creating an unprecedentedamount of interest from potential crew worldwide.

where will I go? 

Wherever there is water! You have the potential to go anywhere around the world.Traditionally the yachting industry has been made up of a ‘Mediterranean Season’ (May toOctober) and a ‘Caribbean Season’ (November to April). There is also no set schedule –some yachts work only one season and some complete back to back seasons. Morerecently the possibilities are endless with many yachts circumnavigating the world in placessuch as the Arctic, Southern, Pacific and Indian oceans.

what will I do?This is dependent on your skills and ambition. You will need to research the industry andform a plan based on your existing skills, interests and previous work background to identifythe position best suited for you.

what hours will I work?The yachting industry isn’t work for the fainthearted. During the height of the season youmay be required to work extremely long days. Yachting is a hospitality-based industry;extensive hours and late nights are common. There are international rules governing thehours of work for all crew, yet some yachts can be more scrupulous than others inobserving these rules.

I’ve been working in the hospitality industry for the last 3 years and fancy achange, would hospitality experience help me?Of course! In many respects the majority of skills that you will have gained in other areasof the hospitality industry are easily transferable to yachting. These skills include; culinary,laundry, silver service, bar tending, flower arranging and sommelier experience. Likewise,any additional skills such as nannying, massage therapy and hairdressing are also valuable.

some say there is a crew shortage whilst others say the opposite?“Crew crisis as super yacht industry grows, there is a global shortage of yacht crew” Thisis a typical message portrayed in the media; the answer is that both statements are true.There is no shortage of unqualified and inexperienced candidates trying to get into theindustry, which is why it’s essential that you make the effort to stand out from the crowd.There is however, a chronic shortage of qualified and experienced crew because of theexplosive growth that the super yacht industry has experienced over the last ten years

Do I need a work visa?During the process of joining a yacht, a captain or a department head will be able toprovide guidance on obtaining the appropriate visa. The UK flag uniquely does not haveany visa or nationality restrictions when working onboard, therefore employment is opento all nationalities.

what is the B1B2 Visa?Non-US citizens, joining a yacht heading to any US port, will require the B1B2 visa. This issimple enough to get once you are employed on a yacht. It is highly recommendedto apply through the U.S. Embassy or Consulate within your country of citizenshipin order to expedite the process. Each individual may apply online for a B1 or B2 visa, usingthe Non-immigrant Online Visa Application DS-160:https://travel.state.gov/content/visas/en/visit/visitor.htmlApplicants must have a passport valid for travel to the U.S. and valid for at least six monthsbeyond the applicant’s intended period of stay in the U.S. (although there are someexemptions for nationals of certain countries). Applicants must also submit a 2×2photograph through the online form. The processing fee for B visas is $160, while the visaissuance fee depends on the country. Once you complete the online application and beforeyour interview, visit the website for the U.S. Embassy or Consulate where you will applyfor the visa: http://www.usembassy.gov/.

Will it be easy to find work?That depends solely on what sort of person you are and how proactive you are in yoursearch for work. In the Mediterranean, you will find that from March onwards, places likeAntibes, Palma and other surrounding areas will be awash with potential new crew lookingfor work. In the Caribbean, crew flood to Fort Lauderdale in October. The competitioncan be fierce and one way that crew tend to build up their experience is by walking thedocks, handing out their CV’s and requesting daywork. Generally speaking, yachts which need an extra pair of hands will employ a “dayworker” to assist with the overflow of work. Most yachts commence work early in the morning therefore you can increase your chances by starting from 8am onwards. Presentation is extremely important in yachting, arriving at a large yacht at 10am with a hangover will NOT get you employment. Day work is probable so try and get out there as much as you can. The key to getting your first job is to network thoroughly with other crew members, crew agencies and yachting affiliates.

Will I have an employment contract?Most of the larger yachts do employ crew under a contract. As a seafarer working underthe British flag, you should sign a “seaman’s employment agreement (SEA)” when you beginto work onboard. This is an official British Government contract signed by all seafarers.Many yachts will also have a separate contract governing standards of behaviour, absenceand leave. On smaller yachts, you may find that no written contract is provided. In the pastthis was typical of the yachting industry thus you should not be unduly concerned whenaccepting a position.

Will I be tested for drugs?More frequently yachts, especially the larger ones, are routinely testing new crew membersfor illegal drugs. It is taken seriously; as a result tests can occur every 6 months, annually oreven sprung on to any crew members without warning. In addition, on some US flaggedvessels crew will have to undergo a background check as well as a hair follicle drug test.

Can the yachting industry be discriminative?All industries are susceptible to different forms of discrimination. Like any industry, theyachting world can experience discrimination in the form of sexism, racism and ageism.Practically speaking, due to the international nature of the industry you do not have thesame level of protection against such discrimination, as you would expect in shore-sideemployment. However, the Maritime Labour Convention (MLC 2006) is now in full affectfor all yachts operating commercially over 500gt. The majority of yacht crew enjoy a fulland interesting career without experiencing problems of this type

Tips for crew before joining yachts:Do your research first. There are several useful websites regarding super yachts andworking as crew, along with information for training courses and certificate requirements.This will enable you to be clear about exactly what sort of job you are best suited for.

•Your CV 

•Your appearance when job hunting; it is important that you achieve a smartappearance and adopt a professional attitude at all times.

•Stay in touch it’s really important when you are looking for work that we know whereyou are and how to get in touch with you, so keep your profile updated at all times.Be assertive and leave your contact details with every job lead you encounter.

•Interviews as for most interviews, using the basic techniques such as punctuality andbeing equipped with a copy of your CV, references and certificates is essential.

•Networking you communicate with others, walk the docks, distribute your CV andregister with crew agencies. Being in the right place at the right time is a common break to a job offer

POSITIONS ONBOARD

captain – navigation, cruising, crew leadership, looking after the owner, guests and budget control

chief mate/first mate – the captain’s second in command

bosun – responsible for the deck team and the immaculate maintenance of the exterior of theyacht

deckhand – crew member performing maintenance of hull, decks, mooring and assistingsuperiors

engineer – mechanical maintenance; ensuring that every piece of equipment remains operational

e.t.o – maintains all aspects of the yachts electrical and electronic systems

chef – responsible for preparing meals for both guests and crew

purser – interior operations, inventory, accounting & guest or owner activity

chief stewardess – responsible for the interior team and the yacht interior

stewardess – responsible for interior maintenance and providing first class services to guestswhilst on board.

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